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Top Softball Tryout Techniques Every Softball Player Should Apply

 

Top softball tryout techniques every softball player should apply

Imagine this. Someone throws a ball to you in a try out and the first thing that shows on the face is panic. All try out colleagues will be laughing at you. This article provides the best techniques required by a player to perfectly clutch the ball. While the first tryout cannot be ideal to make the impression you anticipate to the trainers, with time, these tips will make you win their confidence and become the elite player you always dreamt of.

  • Demonstrate character of a great softball player

The first most important tryout technique is demonstrating the right attitude. A great player should not only posses the right skills, but demonstrates capability to work with others in a team. Gather confidence, be tough and generate as much power as possible. Besides, you should be able to throw harder and become dominant when playing in the field. The focus here is to look tough and be tough while demonstrating the above qualities to standout and help the team win every competition.  Every coach wants a team player so that others can learn progressively.

  • Always prepare properly and keep improving

How can one achieve this? A couple of days before the tryout, it is prudent to acquaint yourself with all the requirements of softball. More importantly, plan and document so that all the drills will take place and you can keep improving on very skill. Every coach is interested in getting players with appropriate skills as well as positions. In particular, you need to ensure that every drill improves your pitching, running and hitting.

  • Demonstrate great athleticism
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Softball Performance Tips – Surviving the Tryout Season

By Ken Krause, Life in the Fastpitch Lane blog

softball-tryoutsYes, it’s hard to believe we’re already in the thick of tryout season. All the comfort of knowing what the days ahead will look like is gone, replaced by that feeling in the pit of your stomach over all the uncertainty that will be dominating your thoughts for the next week or two.

That feeling applies to both players and coaches, by the way. For the players it’s obvious, especially if you’re trying out for a new team.

Suddenly you’re being judged and evaluated by a group of strangers who don’t know your track record. You have to perform right here, right now if you want to be selected. It can be very nerve-wracking, which doesn’t help your performance any.

Yet it can also be stressful for coaches. You can look at all the skills you want, but it doesn’t answer how a player will perform in a game situation, what type of teammate she will be, how high maintenance her parents will be, what kind of game knowledge she has, etc.

In both cases it can be tough because you’re presumably making a long-term decision. Choose correctly and you’re in good shape. Choose poorly and it could make for a very miserable year.

The big key to survival is actually the same strategy for success in a game — focus on the process instead of the result. You can drive yourself crazy worrying about what might happen, especially when it involves things beyond your control. Instead, you want to focus on the things you can control.

As a player, focus on this event, right now, and no others. If you’re fielding ground balls, focus on your process – see it in, get your hands on it and make the throw. For hitting, see ball/hit ball. If you miss, let it go immediately and focus on your next opportunity.

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Softball Tips – Finding the Right Team

By Ken Krause, Life in the Fastpitch Lane blog

choosing a softball teamYes, it’s that time of the year again. The fastpitch softball summer is season is coming to a close, and with it players (and their parents) are starting to look at next year.

For some, the decision will be easy. They like their team, they like their coaches, they want to stay right where they are. For others, it’s not quite as clear-cut.

If you’re in the former group, congratulations. Glad to hear it, although this article probably won’t be of much interest to you. If you’re in the other group, though, you have a lot to think about in the next few weeks (or days).

Where you go likely will depend on your situation and what you want out of the game. If you’re a starter but just unhappy with the coaching, or with some of your teammates, or some other general aspect of the team, you may just be looking for a change of scenery. But if you feel like you haven’t been getting a fair opportunity, you may have to make some tough decisions.

One of the toughest is to leave a team that consistently has a winning record. Winning is fun, no question about it. As Nuke Laloosh would say, it’s more fun than losing. There’s a chance, especially if you move to a team that is just forming, that you will suffer more losses than you’re used to.

So at that point you have to make a decision — would I rather play and maybe lose, or sit and win? It sounds like a no-brainer but it’s really not. Our society is very win-oriented, and losing more than you’re used to can get to you after a while. You have to be strong to accept the idea that playing is better than not playing, no matter what the outcome.

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Softball Tryouts Problem – What Ever Happened to Earning Your Spot?

By Ken Krause, Life in the Fastpitch Lane blog

softball helicopter parentHad an interesting experience with tryouts this year, and I doubt it’s an isolated incident. In fact, it seems to be something that’s indicative of our society as a whole, as it’s not the first time I’ve heard of something like this.

Here’s the basic situation: we had a girl try out for catcher, but then got a note saying she had decided to play for another team. That in and of itself is fine — you should play for whomever you want.

But it was the reason that really stuck with me. Apparently during the tryouts, her dad saw that she clearly was not the best catcher trying out. I then heard through the grapevine he talked to someone affiliated with this other team who promised she’d be number one there, and the decision was made.

I find that rather disturbing. Instead of looking at where his daughter might receive the best training or best competition, he based his decision on the instant gratification of a guaranteed starting spot. It makes me sad, not only for society but for that kid and all the others like her.

A big part of sports is measuring yourself against other players and striving to become the best. If you are in the number two spot, you should have incentive to work on your game and get better. There’s a lot of satisfaction in knocking the former #1 off her pedestal.

Yet that’s not what seems to be happening. Helicopter parents — those who hover over their kids, smoothing the way for them on everything from which teachers they get in school to making sure they get into the right clubs or organizations — don’t want to see their kids fight or struggle for anything.

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Softball Tips – What to Do When Trying Out Injured

By Coach Marc

It’s going to be tryouts season very soon and for most, their summer season had ended or the end is close. Many will be trying out to find a team for next year in the coming weeks.

A common problem is that many players have been carrying injuries for most of the season and injuries take time to heal. Most of  the time, you show up at tryouts a few weeks later and you’re  still injured.

What should you do… tell or not tell the coach?

This is a big debate.

I’ve been talking to several coaches, elite softball athletes,  and also a sports psychologist over the last days and they were all unanimous in saying that you should definitely not hide an injury.

There are 2 reasons for this:

1) You don’t want to make it worse by doing things that you shouldn’t be doing. It will just take more time to heal.

2) Hiding an injury will just make you appear weaker than you really are because you will not be at 100% of your capacity.

The coaches I talked to said that they would factor that in in their evaluation. Also, some said that if the athlete is too injured to try out at the moment but they think that she might have a shot at making their team, they would hold a separate  individual tryout for that athlete.

The point is, even though tempting, you shouldn’t hide an injury from the evaluators at a selection camp. That will not play in your favor.

Coaches know injuries are part of the game and are interested in getting the best players possible. If that means waiting a few weeks to evaluate a player, so be it.

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